Barts Pathology Museum

Please note: This is not Barts Pathology Museum’s full website. For the Museum's blog, event listings, access details and other information please visit www.potts-pots.blogspot.com

 

The beautiful Grade II listed Barts Pathology Museum at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, West Smithfield, houses over 5,000 medical specimens. Purpose built in 1879, it spans three mezzanine levels and includes pathological pots relating to all areas of anatomy and physiology, including the skull of John Bellingham – the only person to assassinate a British Prime Minister.

Barts Pathology Museum is leased by Queen Mary University of London, and is run independently from the hospital.

The Museum is undergoing an extensive period of conservation. As a result it is not open daily, nor to the general public except during the unique and interesting evening events which take place there. Recent events include a Valentine’s Day seminar called ‘Mending Broken Hearts’, a taxidermy course and lectures on subjects such as Sherlock Holmes and The Resurrection Men. 

The Museum's Technical Assistant Curator Carla Valentine runs the Pott's Pots blog, to explore the stories behind some of the Museum's specimens, the building's history and to list forthcoming events.  

Grant funding has been provided to Barts Pathology Museum by The Medical College of Saint Bartholomew's Hospital Trust, a registered charity that promotes and advances medical and dental education and research at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Get in touch

To be placed on the mailing list to receive information about these popular events e-mail Carla Valentine (c.valentine@qmul.ac.uk). You can follow the Museum on Twitter @BartsPathology and on Facebook.

The Museum has a webpage on Culture24. Events are listed on the Pott's Pots blog and regularly feature in Time Out and Evening Standard listings.

How to find us

Our address is:
3rd Floor
Robin Brook Centre
West Smithfield
London
Greater London
EC1A 7BE

How to find the Pathology Museum [PDF 95 KB]